Celebrating Freedom Day

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27 April commemorates the day in 1994 when the first democratic election was held in South Africa. Today, South Africa celebrates Freedom Day to mark the liberation of our country and its people from a long period of colonialism and apartheid

Apartheid ‘officially’ began in South Africa in 1948, but colonialism and oppression of the African majority had plagued South Africa since 1652. After decades of resistance, a stalemate between the Liberation Movement and the apartheid government was reached in 1988.

The ANC, South African Communist Party (SACP), Pan African Congress (PAC) and other organisations were later unbanned on 2 February 1990, and a non-racial constitution was eventually agreed upon and adopted in 1993. On 27 April 1994, the nation finally cast its vote in the first democratic election in the country. The ANC was then voted into power, and Nelson Mandela was inaugurated as the President of South Africa on 10 May.

Mandela Voting - 27 April 1994

It is important to note, however, that “freedom” should mean emancipation from poverty, unemployment, racism, sexism and other forms of discrimination. We are 19 years into our new democracy and many of these issues are still rife in our country. We are still a long way away from solving many of the legacies of apartheid and now face new challenges, like the growing inequality among South Africans and political and economic instability.

Since political freedom in 1994 South Africans have striven to correct the wrongs of the past. We are still faced with a number of challenges such as crime, poverty, unemployment, racism and sexism amongst others. Freedom Day affords South Africans the opportunity to make a pledge towards fighting against the legacy of racism and economic inequality as well as renewing their loyalty to their country and their commitment to its future.

Categories: General.

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